Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2012

In Episode 9 we showed you how to handpaint yarn using food grade dyes.  This is a step by step look at this process as well as how to kettle dye using a crock pot.

You will need:

  • Vinegar
  • Animal based yarn (wool, alpaca, angora, cashmere, etc)
  • Food grade dye (Wilton frosting dye, food coloring, Kool-aid)
  • Jars/bowls
  • Sponges
  • Gloves
  • Toothpicks
  • Plastic Wrap

Soak the yarn in a vinegar/water bath 1 hour to overnight (1/4 cup vinegar to 1 quart water).

Lie plastic wrap on a protected surface. Place your skeined yarn on the wrap. Put on gloves to protect your hands and mix your dyes in cool water to desired depth of color. I used about a quarter teaspoon for our dyes. If you choose to use dye directly on the yarn, use a toothpick to do so.

Using a sponge, dab the dyed water onto the yarn. You want the skein to be saturated.

Change colors using a new sponge. Continue to add color until desired look is achieved.

Wrap yarn in plastic wrap and place in a microwave safe container.

Cook in the microwave for 5 minutes, remove, cool, and cook again for 5 minutes. Again cool and rinse in cool water until water runs clear. Wash with a bit of dish soap if vinegar scent remains.

Hang to dry.

Kettle dying is similar in preparation, but you will not need plastic wrap and you will need a crock pot and tongs.

Begin by preparing your vinegar bath in the crock pot. Turn the pot on to low. You may add dye before or after adding the yarn. I added my dye after, since I wanted more difference between the dark and light areas.  I used black dye on a natural skein.

Allow dye to absorb, adding more dye to the pot as desired. Use tongs to bring bottom yarn to top and distribute the dye. Allow to cook in the crock pot until all dye is absorbed. Turn off heat and allow to cool. This could take a number of hours. When cool, rinse, hang to dry and skein.

My black dye broke into teal, green, red and pink on a grey base. It’s not what I expected, but I do love it!

Some links I found helpful:

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYL_s1EA?p=1%5D

Learn the basics of dying animal based yarns with Wilton food coloring. Plus a giveaway of A Natural Alternative soap products. Julia shows off her illusion necklace from Episode 7, some knitting and new stitchmarkers for her Etsy shop. Sue shows off a table runner she is making and a second crate of Kona cotton fabrics.

Find more A Natural Alternative products here. You can find Hedge and all her products in person at Musikfest in Bethlehem, PA from August 3-12, 2012.

Leave us a comment with a picture or link to a picture or visit our Ravelry group to enter the A Natural Alternative giveaway.  Giveaway ends July 31.

Read Full Post »

Learn one crochet stitch & make a beaded necklace in just a day. Plus a giveaway of A Natural Alternative soap products. Julia shows off her sock monkey hat and an icord bracelet. Sue debuts her new Tootsie horse hair bracelet, plus shows the final, painted version of her mushroom jewelry holder and a crate of Kona cotton fabrics.

Find more A Natural Alternative products here. You can find Hedge and all her products in person at Musikfest in Bethlehem, PA from August 3-12, 2012.

Leave us a comment with a picture or link to a picture or visit our Ravelry group to enter the A Natural Alternative giveaway.  Giveaway ends July 31.

Read Full Post »

During Episode 7 we showed you how to finish an illusion necklace with wire loops and crimps so you can change the number of strands on the necklace on a whim.
Another way to put together the illusion necklace is with bead cones so you create a more finished look.

One of my favorite illusion necklaces has blue art beads with gold cone ends and a magnetic clasp.

For this project you’ll need:
  • three strands of illusion necklace you created
  • round nose pliers
  • straight pliers
  • crimp pliers (if you have them)
  • 2 bead cones
  • 6 to 18 crimp beads
  • 2 jump rings
  • 1 clasp
  • 2 pieces of 3-inch wire, 20 to 22 gauge size
1. Begin by creating a loop at the end of each piece of wire. If you forgot how to do this, watch Episode 4 of Sticks & Stones.
2. String crimp beads on to the end of one of your illusion necklace beading wires, then thread the beading wire through the wire loop and back through the crimps. Use a straight pliers or crimp pliers to close the crimp beads. I like to use three crimps to make sure it is secure. The long tubular bead is called a tornado crimp.
3. Repeat with one end of the remaining two illusion necklace beading wires.
4. Thread the wire through a cone and make a loop at the tip of the cone.
5. Use a jump ring to connect the clasp to the wire loop.
6. Repeat with the other side, securing the ends of the illusion necklace to a loop of wire with crimp beads.
7. Thread the second wire through the second cone and make a loop at the tip of the cone, adding a jump ring for the second half of the clasp.
8. Wear and enjoy!

Read Full Post »

We’re making illusion necklaces- grab some wire, beads, and join in!

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYL88D4A?p=1%5D

Our current projects:

Julia:  Showed off a Monster Chunk, her Potter Vest and a Last Bloom headscarf.  She also showed progress toward her Shawl Collared Sweater. New yarn acquisitions: Knitpicks Imagination in Ruby Slipper and Skinny Bugga! in Rose Weevil.

Sue: Showed us her new ribbon belt, a beautiful chunky gem necklace and her newest horse hair jewelry designs: bangle bracelets.
DIY: Using Crimp Beads. Sue taught how to use crimp beads, crimping pliers and beading wire so you can create a necklace or bracelet.  Both Sue and Julia made illusion necklaces. One method of adding a clasp was demonstrated on the podcast.  See this post on the blog for details on another ways of finishing off your illusion necklace.

Illusion Necklace

We love to hear from you! Please continue to visit us and leave comments/iTunes ratings.

Read Full Post »